Into the Wild

A photographic experiment by Jonas Lindström & BAUX

By: Lisa Baumgartel
Photo: Jonas Lindström

When creating BAUX Acoustic Pulp, the intention was to form a seamless loop from nature to factory to nature again. All the ingredients are borrowed from nature, it’s manufactured in an environmentally friendly way, and the final product is 100% biodegradable. So, we knew know we could put it back into nature again without causing any harm. But still, we were curious—would Nature accept it back?

Here’s what happened.

A wild idea comes to life

We called a meeting with our long-time collaborator and photographer Jonas Lindström, and offered him the challenge: How can we put the “natural” part of BAUX Acoustic Pulp to the test in a real way?

He accepted, and soon the idea was born to place BAUX Acoustic Pulp panels back into the Swedish forest they were first derived from, and take pictures of wild animals interacting with them. Would they treat the panels as foreign, absurd objects or just like another tree? The idea produced an immediate yes, and everyone was on board. Putting it into action, however, was another story entirely.

“At first, I was a little bit anxious about how we should approach the animals,” recalls Jonas. “I really love nature, but I had never taken photos of wild animals before. About 90% of the time I shoot design products, so wild animals like elks and foxes are not my normal subjects.”

Jonas called his team together to discuss different ways to approach the project, and they came up with a simple plan: Find a beautiful location in a Swedish forest, suspend the panels, attract animals with food, then spend two or three days taking pictures from a good hiding spot.

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“I fell in love with the pictures from the beginning, showed them to BAUX, and they loved them too,” says Jonas. “So we decided to use them for the campaign instead of normal nature photos.  An unconventional choice since nobody uses these pictures this way.”

The first task was to find the right location. Jonas and his team decided it would be easiest to choose a fenced in national park or reserve where the animals are were more plentiful and maybe more accustomed to people. After calling around, permission was finally granted to set up the project in an idyllic location on a reserve.

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“We met with him in his small hunting cabin in the woods. He was sitting there having coffee with a friend. It was a super nice experience to meet him. We told him about the project and the trouble we were having getting close to the animals. And he said,, ‘No problem. , We’ll help you find them.’”

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“It was pretty easy to hang the products,” remembers Jonas. “The biggest problem was keeping them straight since we were dealing with wind and rain. BAUX told us the panels could withstand water, and after two months there still haven’t been any issues at all—it’s like they are designed for outdoor use!”

Once on site, however, they ran into an unexpected problem. Jonas was faced with a choice to either delay the project or move on to another location. The answer came while talking to a friend who offered to introduce Jonas to his neighbor, an old and knowledgeable hunter who owns a large wooded area in the South of Sweden just outside Kalmar near a remote town called Skammelstorp.

“It was that time of year when all the acorns were falling off the oak trees,” Jonas says. “The problem was that this is a great and abundant food source for the animals, so it was very difficult to persuade them to come to our place. It wasn’t a good start.”

So the project was back on, and this time with wild animals, in untamed nature, and without fences to help guarantee the existence of populations. Jonas explored the property and, after a couple days, two locations were selected. With the hunter’s guidance, Jonas and his team began setting out food right away to start attracting the animals. Seeds, apples, shrimps. Sometimes, the hunter would even leave out leftovers from ahis hunts.

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After some time, the animals started to come.

The moose, the foxes and deer started to visit. And then wild pigs, pine martens, and ravens

An infrared, movement-detecting Åtel camera, traditionally used by hunters, was ready, strapped to a tree at each location and painted with camouflage. The plan was to use these cameras to detect the presence of the animals, but only use photos taken with a traditional system camera. However, once Jonas saw the first black and white infrared pictures he changed his mind.

100% bio-based BAUX Acoustic Pulp

The new 100% bio-based BAUX Acoustic Pulp panel is the first in the world to uncompromisingly combine the performance properties of sound absorption, safety and durability with sustainability and modern aesthetics. The result is a restful and sustainable acoustical environment for residential buildings, industrial premises and public spaces that calls us back to the harmonizing pulse of nature. Harmless for us, harmless for the environment. It’s nothing short of an acoustical revolution.

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The ingredients:

Sustainably harvested Swedish fir and pine trees. Recycled water. Non-GMO wheat bran. Potato starch. Plant-derived wax. Citrus fruit peels. Zero chemicals.

Want to use BAUX products in your next project?

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